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  1. Rarmer Bot

    Adi Mudra

    Adi mudra is considered the first mudra because it is the first position an infant can make with the hands. It is often used while practicing meditation, and is thought to aid in pranayama because it increases breathing and lung capacity, thus increasing oxygen flow throughout the body The adi mudra is also thought to stimulate the brain, which is closely related to the crown (sahasrara) chakra that governs an individual's sense of peace, higher awareness and oneness with the universe It is recommended to practice adi mudra in a quiet setting while meditating and focusing on the breath, with the palms facing down on the thighs in a seated pose, such as padmasana (lotus pose). Because this mudra calms and soothes the nervous system, it can be beneficial to incorporate into the end of an asana practice
  2. Rarmer Bot

    Rudra Mudra

    Rudra mudra is a hand gesture used in yoga practice that is believed to have powerful healing and energizing qualities. Rudra is a Sanskrit word that means “howler” or “terror.” It is also the name of a Rigvedic deity and is associated with the Hindu god, Shiva. Mudra means “gesture” or “seal To perform rudra mudra, take a comfortable seated position, then touch the tips of the ring and index fingers to the top of the thumb, while the middle and little fingers extend comfortably Rudra mudra is believed to activate the solar plexus (manipura) chakra, which is associated with personal transforming power. This mudra has a wide range of physical and mental benefits, including Improves mental clarity Helps concentration Eases tension Improves circulation and respiration Reduces feelings of dizziness and exhaustion Promotes better eating habits Energizes the body Promotes empowerment Is therapeutic for low blood pressure Improves eyesight Yogis also use rudra mudra to help them reach their potential and achieve their goals
  3. Rarmer Bot

    Shunya Mudra

    Shunya mudra is a simple yoga gesture designed to decrease the space element (akasha) in the body. It is a hasta (hand) mudra, and one of a series of therapeutic mudras thought to have healing properties In this mudra, the tip of the middle finger is placed at the base of the thumb, and the thumb presses gently on the middle finger just below the knuckle. The remaining three fingers stretch comfortably to the sky The name of this mudra comes from the Sanskrit shunya, meaning “emptiness,” “openness” or spaciousness,” and mudra, meaning “gesture” or “seal.” Shunya may also refer to the sky heaven. As such, shunya mudra may be translated as "heaven mudra
  4. Rarmer Bot

    Apana Vayu Mudra

    Apan vayu mudra, also known as mritsanjeevani mudra, is a very powerful mudra, which was in ancient India believed to save lives in case of heart attacks To perform this mudra, the index finger folds and the tip touches the base of the thumb. The tips of the thumb, middle finger and ring finger touch, little finger remains straight and pointing outward Folding the index finger reduces the air element, which helps to relieve pain and relax the body and mind. Connection of the thumb, middle finger and ring finger increases the fire element and the earth element, which helps to detoxify and cleanse the body, supply more oxygen to heart arteries and increase the power of the heart
  5. Rarmer Bot

    Kalesvara Mudra

    Kalesvara Mudra is a hand gesture used to calm the mind and take control over thoughts and emotions. Mudras help to direct the flow of prana or energy within the body, and each had a particular focus or symbolism. This mudra is dedicated to Kalesvara, otherwise known as the Lord of Time. Kalesvara Mudra therefore guides us to contemplate time, death and our behaviours in life, helping us to overcome unwanted traits by shifting the focus from monkey mind to self-observation Kalesvara Mudra can be practiced in any seated meditation posture, using the following steps Bring the tips of the middle fingers together Bring the first and middle joint of the index finger together Bring the thumbs together, creating a heart shape Gently curl the remaining fingers in, and connect the thumbs to the sternum Draw the elbows out to the side
  6. Rarmer Bot

    Mahasirs Mudra

    Mahasirs mudra is a sacred hand gesture or 'seal,' primarily used to treat headaches. It can also improve circulation, relieve stress and eliminate mucus congestion in the sinuses. The tension-relieving effect of this mudra can help to balance energy in both body and mind Follow these steps to practice mahasirs mudra Come to a stable meditation posture On both hands, bring the tips of your thumb, middle finger and index finger together Place your ring fingers in the crease near the base of your thumbs Extend your little fingers Close your eyes and focus on deep and steady breaths This mudra can be practiced as often as required, for at least six minutes. For maximum benefits, practice mahasirs mudra three times per day Mahasirs mudra is also known as the Large Head mudr
  7. Rarmer Bot

    Ushas Mudra

    Ushas mudra is a basic yoga gesture that's designed to energize the body and awaken creativity. It is a hasta (hand) mudra. The name is derived from the Sanskrit ushas, meaning “dawn,” and mudra, meaning “gesture” or “seal In this mudra, the hands are clasped together with the fingers interlaced. For men, the right thumb should be on top. For women, the left thumb rests on top. The top thumb should apply gentle pressure to the other thumb In English, ushas mudra is also known as "the break-of-day mudra" and "the origin of all good things Ushas mudra is believed to bring about change and new beginnings. As such, it can help awaken the body and mind when practiced in the morning Practicing ushas mudra is also thought to have the following benefits Increases clarity and mental alertness Balances the hormones Enlivens sexuality Enhances pleasure In a spiritual yoga practice, this mudra opens the svadisthana (spleen or sacral) chakra, which is associated with creativity and sexuality As with any hasta mudra, ushas mudra is particularly beneficial when meditating, and can be practiced while seated, prone, standing or even walking -- as long as the body is relaxed and the posture is symmetrical. It is recommended that ushas mudra be practiced for five to 15 minutes a day
  8. Rarmer Bot

    Uttarabodhi Mudra

    Uttarabodhi mudra is a yogic hand gesture of enlightenment The hands interlock in front of the navel, leaving the index fingers and thumbs extended. The tips of the index fingers touch, pointing upward, and the tips of the thumbs touch as well, pointing downward This mudra should be practiced for 15 to 20 minutes, one to three times a day to get the best results, but can be performed any time and any place as needed Practicing uttarabodhi mudra is a great way to calm the excited mind, or soothe the nerves before starting any seemingly overwhelming task It is believed that uttarabodhi mudra is great for improving self-confidence and realizing the inner Self. It removes fear and teaches one to not worry about anything but God Uttarabodhi mudra is also said to help inspiration, problem-solving and decision-making, as well as improve focus and concentration
  9. Rarmer Bot

    Asthma Mudra

    The asthma mudra is a symbolic, ritualistic gesture of the hands used in a yoga practice to relieve the yogi of asthma attacks. From Sanskrit, mudra means "gesture," "mark" or "seal." This gesture, when displayed along with pranayama or a meditative practice, is thought to assist yogis in relieving mild asthma attacks or, when practiced routinely, aids in preventing them To practice this mudra, bend the middle fingers of both hands, pressing the fingernails of both middle fingers together. Palms should press together gently with the other fingers remaining straigh It is believed that the asthma mudra relaxes muscles that line the respiratory tract, offering relief to those who experience asthma or breathing difficulties. Mudras are thought by yogis to influence the biological map contained in the brain, and the asthma mudra specifically offers relaxation to the bronchial tubes For the asthma mudra to be effective, it is recommended to practice for five minutes at three times a day, and can be used in addition to a pranayama, meditative or asana practice. It is recommended to practice for 15 minutes when experiencing breathing difficulty
  10. Rarmer Bot

    Bhairava Mudra

    Bhairava mudra is a symbolic, ritualistic gesture of the hands often used in a spiritual yoga practice to produce a balanced energy flow during meditation. Bhairava is a Hindu deity associated with annihilation and considered a ferocious manifestation of Shiva the Destroyer; it is also a Sanskrit term meaning "terrible" or frightful." Also a Sanskrit term, mudra means "gesture," "mark" or "seal In this mudra, the right hand is placed on top of the left hand with the palms facing up. The left hand can also be placed on the right hand in a variation called bhairavi mudra Bhairava mudra is considered a natural gesture that brings harmony to the body’s energy flow during meditation and pranayama practice. When the hand positions are reversed (where the left hand is positioned on top of the right hand), it is believed to activate consciousness and manifestation Within Tantric texts and yoga practice, Bhairava mudra is considered the ultimate mudra, where individual awareness is unified in the mind and body -- both the inward and outward Self are one
  11. Rarmer Bot

    Varada Mudra

    Varada Mudra is a sacred hand gesture or 'seal' practiced during meditation. Also known as favorable mudra, it is a gesture of granting wishes or mercy, often found in the depiction of Hindu Gods Follow these steps to practice Varada Mudra Come to a stable sitting posture with an upright spine Rest your hands on your knees Turn the left palm to face forward and point the left fingers downwards Varada Mudra can be held for as long as feels comfortable, throughout a meditation Varada Mudra signifies compassion, charity and sincerity. It is symbolic of giving and forgiveness, and can often be found on statues of the Buddha or Hindu Gods. Varada Mudra is typically combined with another mudra in the right hand, such as the Abhaya Mudra This mudra embodies the connection between giving and forgiveness. Someone who gives will be forgiven, whilst someone who forgives will be richly blessed. Forgiveness is a challenging facet of human nature, but the open hand of this gesture encourages the art of forgiveness in the practitioner
  12. Rarmer Bot

    Merudanda Mudra

    Merudanda mudra is a simple yoga hand gesture used in meditation or pranayama that helps the yogi focus on the breath, among other benefits. Merudanda mudra resembles a thumbs-up gesture. The name comes from the Sanskrit, merudanda, meaning “spine” or “spinal column”; and mudra, meaning “seal” or “gesture Merudanda mudra is typically practiced while seated in sukhasana (easy pose), although any comfortable seated position works. The thumbs of each hand are extended, while the other fingers curl into the palm. The hands then rest on the thighs or knees with the thumbs pointing up Categorized as an hasta (hand) mudra, merudanda mudra is one of three similar mudras that comprise the merudanda mudra sequence. The others are: Adho merudanda mudra (thumbs pointing toward each other) Urdhva merudanda mudra (thumbs pointing away from each other) It is believed that merudanda mudra helps direct the breath to the solar plexus. It also helps calm the mind and improve focus and concentration. The related breathwork improves respiration and circulation Hasta mudras are thought to circulate energy throughout the body, depending on the particular mudra. For that reason, merudanda mudra should not be practiced on a full stomach or by yogis with high blood pressure or heart disease
  13. Rarmer Bot

    Vitraka Mudra

    Vitarka mudra is a symbolic, ritualistic hand gesture used in yoga, Buddhism and Hinduism. The term comes from the Sanskrit, vitarka, meaning “reasoning,” “consideration” or “deliberation”; and mudra, meaning “closure,” “mark” or “seal.” Vitarka mudra is also known as the “gesture of debate” or the “discussion mudra To perform vitarka mudra, the tip of the index finger and thumb touch while the other fingers extend toward the sky. The palm typically faces outward, away from the body In addition to being symbolic, mudras are used in yoga and meditation to control the flow of energy in the body and unblock chakras. Although hand mudras are the most common in yoga, there are also head, postural, lock and perineal mudras In vitarka mudra, the circle formed by the index finger and thumb symbolizes the flow of information and energy. This mudra is most often associated with the Buddha, representing the transmission of his wisdom and used when explaining his teachings. It is a common hand gesture used in Buddha statuary, particularly those of ancient Thailand There are variations of this mudra. Historically, only the right hand displayed the mudra, but today it is often practiced with both hands. Sometimes the thumb and middle finger touch, symbolizing compassion, or the thumb and ring finger touch, meaning good fortune. In another version of vitarka mudra, the left hand rests palm up in the lap while the right hand is raised to shoulder level with the thumb and index finger touching
  14. Rarmer Bot

    Garuda Mudra

    The garuda mudra is used to balance the air -- or vata -- energy in the body, creates inspiration and energizes the yogi. The word garuda means “eagle” in Sanskrit and mudra means, “gesture of.” By activating blood flow, the garuda mudra invigorates and balances the vata energy on both sides of the body To perform garuda mudra, maintain an erect posture, place the right hand on top of the left hand, with the right thumb hooking around the knuckle of the other thumb. The mudra should look like a bird's wings, with the palms of the hands facing you. Soften the shoulders and place the hands in front of the low abdomen; hold the mudra for ten breaths. Move the hands up the body, stopping at the navel and the center of the chest for ten breaths. This mudra should be performed tree times per day The position of the hands in garuda mudra represents the eagle Garuda, who transports Lord Krishna. When a yogi holds the mudra, they invoke the the energy of Garuda by physically expressing the mudra As the garuda mudra is held, like the wings of an eagle, the breath, or pranayama, balances the energy of the air in the body. When vata energy is out of balance in the body, it is common to feel either stuck or completely scattered. Holding garuda mudra controls the air by bringing it in if you are stuck or by calming it down when you feel scattered. Once the vata is balanced, a yogi will be inspired and energized
  15. Rarmer Bot

    Mushti Mudra

    Mushti mudra is a yogic gesture designed to help release pent-up emotions. It is an hasta (hand) mudra and one of a series of therapeutic mudras thought to have healing properties To perform this mudra, each hand makes a fist and the thumb stretches over the first three fingers to touch the ring finger The term comes from the Sanskrit, mushti, meaning “closed hand” or “fist,” and mudra, meaning “gesture” or “seal.” This mudra, therefore, is also known as the fist mudra Hasta mudras can be done seated, prone, standing or even walking, as long as the posture is symmetrical and the body is relaxed. For the therapeutic benefits, mushti mudra should be practiced three times a day for 15 minutes. Practicing mushti mudra following a meal is believed to activate energy in the stomach and liver, thereby aiding digestion It is also thought to have the following benefits Relieves negative emotions such as anger, fear and frustration Eases constipation Releases tension in the body Clears the mind of worry and unwanted thoughts Lowers blood pressure Fists are generally seen as a sign of aggression and one that forms naturally during times of extreme emotion, but the mudra is believed to release such emotions because they are balanced in the palm of the hands. The mudra, paired with yogic meditation, is a great stress-reducer
  16. Rarmer Bot

    Pushan Mudra

    Pushan Mudra is a sacred hand gesture or 'seal,' used in yoga as a means of improving digestion and nourishment. Otherwise known as the gesture of digestion, Pushan Mudra is Sanskrit for 'one who nourishes,' and is particularly used to stoke digestive fire. It can help to remove toxins from the body, improve elimination and stimulate the gallbladder, liver and stomach. It is symbolic of acceptance, receiving and letting go. Pushan Mudra is made up of two different gestures; Apana Vayu Mudra in the right hand and Prana Vayu Mudra in the left hand. Follow these steps to practice Pushan Mudra: Right Hand: Touch the tips of your index finger, middle finger and thumb together. Extend the other fingers outward, palm facing up. Left Hand: Touch the tips of your middle finger, ring finger and thumb together. Extend the other fingers outward, palm facing up. This mudra can be practiced for 5 minute periods throughout the day, whilst in a stable sitting posture. The benefits of Pushan Mudra are increased if practiced during meditation, whilst focussing on the breath. Pushan Mudra stimulates the svadisthana chakra (sacral chakra), helping to remove any energetic blockages whilst providing relaxation for the physical body. According to Ayurveda, the five fingers represent the five elements, and so this mudra helps to bring balance by stimulating all five.
  17. Rarmer Bot

    Bhramara Mudra

    Bhramara Mudra is a sacred hand gesture or 'seal,' used during yoga or meditation practice as a means of directing the flow of energy. Sanskrit for "bee," bhramara is an Indian dance after which this mudra is named. Bhramara mudra is primarily used to protect against allergies and treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Follow these steps to practice bhramara mudra Find a stable sitting posture and rest your hands on your thighs with palms facing up On both hands, place your index finger in the fold of your thumb Place the tip of your thumb on the side of your middle fingernail Extend your ring and little fingers Hold this position of the hands and focus on deep, steady breaths Bhramara mudra can help to ease the symptoms of respiratory conditions, such as bronchitis and asthma, by easing congestion in the lungs and sinuses. With regular practice, bhramara mudra can strengthen and bolster the immune system, which is often weakened as a result of such conditions This mudra should be practiced for at least seven minutes, up to four times a day. With practice, you can increase the time to twenty minutes, up to eight times a day
  18. Rarmer Bot

    Karana Mudra

    Karana mudra is a sacred hand gesture or "seal" used during yoga and meditation practice as a means of channeling the flow of vital life force energy known as prana. The karana mudra helps to dispel negativity, anxiety, fear and depression whilst enhancing feelings of happiness and contentment. It stimulates Fire and Ether elements within the body, represented by the thumb and middle finger respectively. Karana mudra is a hasta mudra, which means it is carried out with the hands. To perform this mudra, the left hand is brought up to the heart, palm facing forward. The ring and middle fingers fold in toward the center of the palm, held down gently by the tip of the thumb. The index and little fingers point straight upward. There are no contraindications to this mudra and it should be held for a minimum of 15 minutes. Karana mudra is also known as the "gesture for warding off evil Karana mudra is popular within the Buddhist tradition, and the Buddha is often depicted performing this gesture. In Buddhism, karana mudra is believed to remove obstacles, cultivate inner peace and guide the practitioner towards enlightenment. In yoga, this gesture is used to cultivate a strong energy that has the power to eliminate negative prana from body, mind and spirit. Although karana mudra may be used during asana practice, it is most commonly performed during meditation. Chanting a mantra may help to enhance the benefits of karana mudra, particularly those which are intended to overcome obstacles such as Ganesha Mantra. Ironically, karana mudra is similar to the Western gesture "sign of the horns," generally used as a symbol of the devil. Not only is karana mudra used to ward off rather than represent evil, but the two gestures differ slightly in that sign of the horns generally does not use the tip of the thumb to hold down the middle and ring fingers. Instead, the thumb is either extended or the entire length of the thumb covers the middle and ring fingers. According to Feng Shui principles, images of the Buddha performing karana mudra should not face the front door, as this space should have a welcoming energy. They should also not be placed in a bedroom or children’s room. The best placement for karana mudra in the home is a problem area which is either low in energy or in need of a strong energetic clearing
  19. Rarmer Bot

    Prithvi Mudra

    Prithvi mudra is a symbolic hand gesture or ‘seal’ used in yoga and Ayurveda to promote healing and spiritual balance within the body. Meaning "the vast one" in Sanskrit, prithvi is also the term used for the Earth element in Ayurveda. Otherwise known as ‘Earth Mudra’, prithvi mudra can be used to balance this element, which resides primarily within tissues, such as skin, hair and bones. To practice prithvi mudra, the tips of the ring fingers should be pressed to the tips of the thumbs on each hand, whilst extending the other fingers straight. This mudra can be practiced in any comfortable and stable seated meditation posture, such as padmasana (Lotus Pose) or sukhasana (Easy Pose), ideally for at least 30 to 45 minutes a day. According to Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine, the physical body is made up of five elements; Earth, Air, Fire, Water and Space. Imbalance in any one of these five elements is thought to be the root cause of illness and disease, therefore, treatments tend to focus on bringing each element back into balance. When the earth element is in balance, we are both mentally and physically strong, confident and stable. Earth is a major part of the physical body, and so this element plays a vital role in health and wellbeing. Prithvi mudra is primarily used to increase the Earth element within an individual as a means of healing. However, since the ring finger symbolizes earth and the thumb symbolizes fire, this gesture can also be used to bring balance between these two elements. It is considered to be a powerful mudra, capable of healing many ailments, such as chronic fatigue, osteoporosis, weight loss, convalescence or paralysis, burning sensations throughout the body, ulcers, and nail, hair or skin issues. When used as part of a yoga practice, the prithvi mudra is thought to stimulate the muladhara chakra (root energy centre), governing an individual's sense of stability, rootedness and security. This chakra is also associated with instincts and one's primal nature. Practitioners may use this mudra during a chakra meditation, in which focus on the muladhara chakra’s red colour may help to amplify the benefits of prithvi mudra. Prithvi mudra may also be combined with a pranayama exercise, such as three part breath, in order to increase its effects. Although it is highly recommended to use this gesture during meditation, it may also be practiced in tadasana (Mountain Pose) or whilst sitting in a chair. Prithvi mudra is not recommended for pregnant women as they are more sensitive to any changes within the five elements. Those with excess kapha dosha should also avoid prithvi mudra, since this condition is characterized by increased earth element. During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced. To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz. Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.
  20. Rarmer Bot

    Chinmaya Mudra

    Chinmaya mudra, which is also referred to as "the gesture of awareness," is one of the powerful mudras that promote physical and mental health. Chinmaya is a Sanskirt word which means "supreme awareness," "full of knowledge" or "pure wisdom"; and mudra means "gesture" or "seal." Mudras can be practiced for up to 45 minutes. It is highly recommended to practice a mudra for at least 15 minutes a day To practice chinmaya mudra, assume padmasana, vajrasana or sukhasana. Bring the tips of the thumb and forefinger together and form a circle. Curl the remaining fingers into your palms. Place your palms on the upper thighs. The palms can face upward or downward. Keep the eyes closed and breathe through the nose. Start practicing the mudra for 10 minutes and gradually increase the duration for up to 45 minutes. The benefits of practicing chinmaya mudra include: Promotes flow of prana Positively impacts the energy in the thoracic region Promotes breathing in the midsection of the lungs Improves digestion During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else
  21. Rarmer Bot

    Dhyana Mudra

    Dhyana mudra is a sacred hand gesture or ‘seal,’ used during yoga and meditation practice as a means of channeling the flow of vital life force energy known as prana. Dhyana mudra is one of the most commonly known and widely practiced hand gestures, found across several religious and spiritual traditions such as Buddhism, Hinduism and yoga. Dhyana mudra is a hasta mudra, which means it is performed using the hands. It may be practiced in any stable seated posture, such as sukhasana (easy pose) or padmasana (lotus pose). It is performed by resting the right hand on top of the left, palms facing up and the thumbs slightly lifted so that the tips touch one another. Dhyana mudra has no contraindications, and can therefore be practiced by anyone at any time. For maximum benefits, this mudra should be practiced daily during meditation for at least 30 minutes. Dhyana mudra is sometimes also called yoga mudra or samadhi mudra Mudras are used within yoga and meditation practice as a means of moving, controlling and sealing prana within the body. Dhyana mudra is specifically used to deepen concentration and guide the practitioner towards inner peace and equanimity. The right hand, representing enlightenment and states of higher consciousness, rests over the left hand, representing maya, or illusion. This is believed to bring balance to the two sides of the body and brain as a means of quieting the mind. This mudra represents the gesture of total balance. The person using this mudra during meditation is immersed in the limitless space, completely untouched by the outside world. The right hand symbolizes wisdom and awareness and the left one symbolizes the illusion of existence. Sanskrit for "meditation," dhyana is the seventh of Patanjali’s eight limbs of yoga, distinct from the practice of concentration known as dharana. Dhyana is a state in which it is no longer possible to perceive the act of meditation or separate a sense of self from it, and is the preliminary stage before samadhi (bliss or absorption). Dhyana mudra can therefore help the practitioner to progress from dharana towards deeper states of meditation. The Buddha is often depicted as practicing dhyana mudra whilst in meditation, and its triangular shape is said to represent the three jewels of Buddhism: Buddha, sangha (community) and dharma (teachings). The connection of the thumbs is also believed to symbolize the union of male and female principles that are present in every human being. According to Buddhism, dhyana mudra was practiced by Sakyamuni Buddha during his meditation under the Bodhi tree. As such, this gesture is symbolic of enlightenment and freedom from suffering and can be found in many artistic depictions of the Buddha in meditation. In Theravada Buddhism, the Buddha is depicted with thumbs resting against the palms rather than with the tips of the thumbs touching. During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced. To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz. Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.
  22. Rarmer Bot

    Abhaya Mudra

    Abhaya mudra is a sacred hand gesture or ‘seal’ used during yoga and meditation practice as a means of channeling the flow of vital life force energy known as prana. This gesture is used to dispel fear and develop courage, highlighted by the name abhaya which is Sanskrit for "fearlessness." Abhaya mudra is symbolic of safety, protection, peace and reassurance, and can be called upon during challenging times. Abhaya mudra is a hasta mudra, meaning it is practiced using the hands. This gesture is performed with the right handheld upright at shoulder height, palm open and facing forwards. It is most often practiced using only the right hand, but some images of the walking Buddha depict this mudra with both hands at shoulder height and the palms facing out. In Mahayana Buddhism, it is often paired with another mudra using the left hand. In Japan, the abhaya mudra may be seen with the middle finger slightly projected forward, symbolic of the Shingon. For maximum benefits, it should be practiced daily for up to 30 minutes Abhaya mudra is generally symbolic of fearlessness and good intentions, but it can also be interpreted with a more specific meaning depending on the region and era in which it was used. When depicted on images of the Buddha using only the left hand, this gesture is said to be a means of forbidding relatives to fight, referring to an event in which he used abhaya mudra to dispel a family argument over water rights. In images of the Buddha with both hands raised, abhaya mudra is also referred to as the gesture of ‘calming the ocean,’ symbolic of an occasion where Buddha is said to have prevented a flood. This ancient gesture is thought to be the first mudra the Buddha used after reaching enlightenment and is depicted on a number of Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Sikh images. However, since it is a gesture that displays the hands empty of weapons, it is likely that abhaya mudra predates the emergence of religion and was used long before as a symbol of peace and good intention between strangers. It is also associated with preaching, and could be interpreted as symbolic of openness towards a congregation. In yoga, abhaya mudra can be used during meditation in any stable seated posture such as padmasana (lotus pose) or virasana (hero pose). It is sometimes practiced in a modification of Virabhadrasana II (warrior II), in which the practitioner raises the front hand into abhaya mudra as a display of humility and strength. This mudra can be called upon as a means of overcoming fears or phobias, and to provide a sense of internal protection. During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else
  23. Rarmer Bot

    Shakti Mudra

    Shakti mudra is a symbolic, ritualistic gesture of the hands often used in Ayurvedic or spiritual yoga practice to produce calming effects on the mind and body, specifically the pelvic area. In order to perform this mudra, the fourth and fifth fingers (the ring and little fingers) of both hands are pressed together, while the other fingers curl into a fist-like position, with the thumbs tucked against the palms. In Sanskrit, shakti means “power” or “empowerment,” and mudra means “gesture,” “mark,” or “seal It is believed that the shakti mudra is capable of curing insomnia by calming and relaxing the individual who practices it. In addition, it is thought that this hand gesture relaxes the pelvic area, offering relief to those with intestinal or menstrual discomfort. The shakti mudra is calming to the nervous system and can be practiced anywhere and anytime an individual is seeking relief. However, it is recommended to practice this gesture in a quiet setting, while focusing on the breath, if possible, for no more than 10-15 minutes at three times a day. Over-use of this mudra is thought to cause lethargy. For those who engage in a spiritual yoga practice, the shakti mudra is thought to influence the svadisthana (spleen or sacral) chakra, and is often considered a sensual or “feminine” mudra due to its effect on the pelvic area. This mudra can be combined with meditative poses like padmasana (lotus pose), or with pelvic-opening postures like malasana (garland pose) or utkata konasana (goddess pose) to deepen its effects. During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced. To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz. Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.
  24. Rarmer Bot

    Vayu Mudra

    Vayu mudra is a yogic hand gesture believed to help regulate and reduce the air element within the body. The name comes from the Sanskrit, vayu, meaning "air," and mudra, meaning "gesture." Vayu mudra is one of the easiest mudras to perform. It is performed by placing the tip of the index finger inside the base of the thumb. The base of the thumb is then gently pressed into the tip of the finger. The rest of the fingers should all remain straight, and it should be done with both hands simultaneously. It is recommended that yogis suffering from conditions caused by excess air in the body perform this mudra regularly in order to maintain good health It is said that the fire element resides in the thumb and the air element in the index finger. In this way, the air element is suppressed by the fire of the thumb in this mudra. Vayu mudra is associated with the Ayurvedic vata dosha because vata is associated with the air element. Thus, vayu mudra can be helpful for those who suffer from aggravated vata or who are of the vata dosha constitution. There is a whole range of other conditions that respond well to practicing this mudra, including: Parkinson’s - It is thought to reduce the tremors Stress and anxiety - It is believed to calm a stressed nervous system and soothe the mind General pain - It is said to be helpful for pain management Joint pain - It is believed to soothe the pain associated with rheumatism, sciatica or gout Endocrine system - It supports skin and cartilage During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced. To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz. Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.
  25. Rarmer Bot

    Vishnu Mudra

    Vishnu mudra is a sacred hand gesture or "seal," used during yoga and meditation practice as a means of channeling the flow of vital life force energy called prana. Otherwise known as the "gesture of universal balance," this mudra is named in honor of Lord Vishnu, one of the principal deities of Hinduism. To practice Vishnu mudra, the index and middle finger are curled in toward the palm, whilst the other three fingers remain extended. Vishnu mudra is always practiced with the right hand, symbolic of receiving energy. When using this mudra to perform nadi shodhana, the thumb and the ring finger are used to gently block alternate nostrils as the practitioner moves the breath from left to right. For maximum benefit, Vishnu mudra should be practiced alongside nadi shodhana for a minimum of 5 to 10 minutes daily, ideally prior to meditation. It can be performed at any time of day, and is best practiced on an empty stomach A mudra is a sacred and symbolic gesture found in yoga, Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, translated from Sanskrit as "mark" or "seal." In yoga, mudras are believed to affect the physical and energy bodies by helping to clear energy channels known as nadis. Vishnu mudra is a hasta mudra, meaning that it is performed with the hands. It is most commonly used during nadi shodhana, a pranayama practice known in English as "alternate nostril breathing." Vishnu mudra amplifies the effects of this pranayama, and is believed to bring balance, strength and peace of mind to the practitioner. Nadi shodhana is one of the most fundamental pranayama techniques for clearing nadis and balancing prana, and Vishnu mudra is a key component of this practice. Vishnu mudra is typically performed in a stable, seated meditation posture such as siddhasana (Accomplished Pose), padmasana (Lotus Pose) or sukhasana (Easy Pose). This mudra is believed to activate the first three energy centres of the body; the muladhara (root) chakra, svadhisthana (sacral) chakra and the manipura (solar plexus) chakra. The ring finger is symbolic of the earth element and muladhara chakra, the little finger represents water and svadhisthana, whilst the thumb symbolizes fire and manipura. By extending these digits in Vishnu mudra, the practitioner encourages a flow of energy to the corresponding elements and chakras within. The index finger is symbolic of ego, and bows down together with the middle finger to encourage humility. In addition to its impact on the chakras and elements within the body, Vishnu mudra is believed to bring balance to the left and right hemispheres of the brain. It can also help to: Reduce stress and anxiety. Calm the nervous system. Still the mind in preparation for meditation. Improve concentration, clarity and focus. Balance hormones. Detoxify the body. During These Times of Stress and Uncertainty Your Doshas May Be Unbalanced. To help you bring attention to your doshas and to identify what your predominant dosha is, we created the following quiz. Try not to stress over every question, but simply answer based off your intuition. After all, you know yourself better than anyone else.
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